.

Janet Jackson Parts Company With Island Def Jam

September 22, 2008 5:57 PM ET

After only one album, Janet Jackson's tenure with Island Def Jam has come to a sudden halt, as the singer was released from her contract per her request. During her brief stay at the label, Jackson frequently lamented that the label wasn't doing its part to properly promote her most recent album, Discipline. Despite coming in Number One the week of its release, Discipline still sold fewer copies than her two previous albums. "We didn't get the support from the record company," producer Rodney "Darkchild" Jenkins said in a vlog post (which you can watch above). "[Janet] felt like it wasn't pushed. She just didn't get her just due as an artist of that magnitude." Whether she signs to another label in the near future or not, for the time being Jackson brings some much-needed R&B flavor to the industry's free agent pool, with artists like Radiohead, Nine inch Nails and Smashing Pumpkins all operating without a record contract. Jackson is currently on the road promoting Discipline on the Rock Witchu Tour.

Related Stories:
Janet Jackson Opens Rock Witchu Tour With Three Decades of Hits, Video Duets and Pyro
Janet Jackson Super Bowl Flash Fine Tossed
On The Charts: Janet Jackson Wrestles Top Spot From Jack Johnson

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vicious”

Lou Reed | 1972

Opening Lou Reed's 1972 solo album, the hard-riffing "Vicious" actually traces its origin back to Reed's days with the Velvet Underground. Picking up bits and pieces of songs from the people and places around him, and filing his notes for later use, Reed said it was Andy Warhol who provided fuel for the song. "He said, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Vicious,'" Reed told Rolling Stone in 1989. "And I said, 'What kind of vicious?' 'Oh, you know, vicious like I hit you with a flower.' And I wrote it down literally."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com