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Jane's Addiction Teams with Dave Sitek on New Album

TV On The Radio bassist will co-write the band's fourth studio release

January 4, 2011 3:50 PM ET
Jane's Addiction Teams with Dave Sitek on New Album
Rui M. Leal/Getty

Jane's Addiction will be collaborating with TV on the Radio member Dave Sitek for their forthcoming album, due sometime this summer. Sitek will be filling in as the band's bassist, a role previously occupied by Flea, Chris Chaney and original member Eric Avery.

A Brief History of Jane's Addiction

Though Sitek is known for his production work with TV On The Radio, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Scarlett Johansson and Liars, he will only be contributing as a writer and performer on the album. Rich Costey, best known for his work with Muse and Franz Ferdinand, will produce.

Video: TV on the Radio's Dave Sitek on His Poppy New Disc

Though Jane's Addiction have existed on and off for over 25 years, this work in progress will yield only their fourth full-length studio release.

Dave Sitek joins Jane's Addiction (sort of) [Brooklyn Vegan]

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