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James Murphy Remixes David Bowie

Former LCD Soundsytem frontman expands 'Love Is Lost' into 10-minute dance opus

James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem performs in New York City.
Andrew H. Walker/WireImage
October 10, 2013 10:50 AM ET

James Murphy's massive 10 minute remix of David Bowie's "Love Is Lost" premiered on BBC Radio 6 this morning, and you can now hear it in full over at Pitchfork (the track will be available to stream on Bowie's website later today, as well).

The former LCD Soundsystem frontman transformed the Next Day track into a slow-burner that starts with incessant click-clack percussion and jittery synth stabs. Halfway through, the track opens up into a steady dance groove -- a close listen hints at what sounds like a piano sample from Bowie's "Ashes to Ashes," but it's actually Murphy's reinterpretation of the classic lick.

See Where David Bowie Falls on Our List of the Greatest Singers

Murphy's reworking of the track will appear on the three-disc deluxe edition of The Next Day, due out November 4th. The new edition will include a DVD and a slew of extras, including five unheard tracks and another brand new remix. 

This is the second time Bowie and Murphy have worked together in recent months, with the former lending his vocals to Arcade Fire's "Reflektor," a track that the latter produced.

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