.

James Blunt, Snow Patrol Rule Decade-End U.K. Charts

December 30, 2009 12:00 AM ET

While the Beatles' greatest hits compilation 1 was the bestselling album in the U.S. this decade, the charts across the pond told a decidedly different story: James Blunt's Back to Bedlam, which boasted the hit "You're Beautiful," was the bestselling album in the U.K. in the 2000s, BBC reports. The disc finished Number One on a Top 10 that featured nine Brit artists and an unlikely American act.

The U.K.'s second biggest seller of the 2000s was Dido's No Angel, which beat out a pair of albums from British singers that made waves in the U.S.: Amy Winehouse's Back to Black and Leona Lewis' Spirit. David Grey's White Ladder finished at Number Five, while the aforementioned Fab Four collection 1 placed sixth. 1 enjoyed 11.4 million in sales in the States since its release in November 2000. The lone American act to make it onto the British Top 10? It wasn't Eminem or Beyoncé, but the Scissor Sisters' self-titled debut, which hit Number Nine on the Brit charts.

The Scissor Sisters' "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'," from the band's 2006 album Ta-Dah, was also the U.K.'s third most-played song of the decade, according to the BBC. The 2000s' Number One most played song in the U.K. was Snow Patrol's "Chasing Cars," edging out Take That's "Shine." Surprisingly, even though Back to Bedlam topped the album's chart, "You're Beautiful" only placed seventh on the most played list. Rolling Stone's Number One Song of the 2000s, Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy," came in at Number 10 on the list.

Look back at Rolling Stone's best of decade picks in our All-Time Greats.

Related Stories:
Eminem and The Beatles: The Top-Selling Artists of the 2000s
Rolling Stone's 100 Best Songs of the 2000s

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com