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Jackson Employees Want to Speak Out Regarding Singer's Death

August 26, 2009 10:06 AM ET

Two employees of Michael Jackson who were present in the singer's home on June 25th want to help investigators piece together the events leading up to the star's death. Michael Amir, Jackson's personal assistant, and Alberto Alvarez, a security guard who reportedly placed the 911 call demanding an ambulance, had brief informal talks with police the day Jackson died, but their lawyer Carl Douglas says the two men can shed new light on the June 25th timeline, the Los Angeles Times reports.

For instance, at 12:13 p.m. on June 25th, Amir received a panicked four-second message from Jackson's personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, that essentially said, "Come quick." Nine minutes later, paramedics were called to Jackson's home. Douglas said both of his clients are eager to share more information with authorities but have so far been stonewalled. However, Douglas wouldn't elaborate on what other information his clients might tell authorities.

Look back at Jackson's life and career, in photos.

"We arranged two separate occasions for LAPD investigators to meet with my clients. My clients came early wearing suits and ties. The first meeting was canceled and rescheduled. The second meeting I had to call them to inquire about the [detectives'] absence," Douglas told the LAT. The LAPD wouldn't comment on an open investigation. Because Alvarez was in the room with Murray in the moments before paramedics arrived, Douglas believes his client could provide crucial information and help confirm or deny whatever Dr. Murray had previously told investigators in interviews.

As Rock Daily previously reported, the coroner overseeing Jackson's case has declared the death a homicide, and Murray remains the focus of the investigation. An unsealed search warrant revealed that Jackson likely died from an overdose of a drug "cocktail" including 25 mgs of the powerful anesthetic Propofol, Valium and other sedatives, a combination that ultimately caused Jackson to stop breathing and suffer sudden cardiac arrest.

Stars and fans pay tribute to MJ: check out photos from his star-studded memorial.

According to the LA Times, and despite Murray's lawyer Ed Chernoff's denials, police also believe that Murray made three phone calls totaling 47 minutes in the hour of Jackson's death. However, contrary to previous reports that stated Murray left Jackson alone after administering Propofol to make calls, the Times writes that those phone calls reportedly didn't begin until 11:18 a.m., or 18 minutes after Murray discovered Jackson wasn't breathing. If this new timeline is accurate, considering 911 wasn't called until 12:22 p.m., that's an hour and twenty-two minute gap between when Murray found Jackson not breathing to when paramedics were called.

Related Stories:
Conrad Murray's Lawyer Disputes "Police Theory" in Jackson's Death
Warrant Reveals Jackson Likely Died After Dose of Propofol; Coroner Declares Death Homicide
Jackson Doctor Conrad Murray Breaks His Silence in New Video

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