.

Jack White Says He'll Never Form Another New Band

Singer says that he will either record solo, or with his bands the Raconteurs and the Dead Weather

February 23, 2011 9:30 AM ET
 Jack White performs at The El Rey Theatre on January 23, 2011 in Los Angeles, California
Jack White performs at The El Rey Theatre on January 23, 2011 in Los Angeles, California
Noel Vasquez/Getty

Jack White has told the British rock magazine Q that he will never form another band, and will spend the rest of his career either playing with his bands the Raconteurs or the Dead Weather, or working as a solo artist. "If I can't say it in any of these bands, then I'll say it by myself," he said.

Photos: The Many Guises of Jack White


This declaration comes only three weeks after White announced the end of his most famous band, The White Stripes. Since White is mainly the drummer of the Dead Weather, and the Raconteurs is a collaboration with songwriter Brendan Benson, this effectively means that all material focused on his voice going forward will be released as solo work. It could also mean that whatever White does in the future will not sound much like his music with Meg White in the White Stripes.

Photos: The White Stripes, From the Book 'Under Great White Northern Lights'


In recent years, White has seemed to take a conscious step away from the spotlight. In addition to taking a non-frontman role in the Raconteurs and the Dead Weather, he has spent a great deal of time focused on running his Third Man Records label and working as a producer for artists such as Wanda Jackson and Loretta Lynn.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com