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Jack White Made Honorary Dean of Music Academy

Musician also received a Lifetime Achievement Award

September 4, 2013 5:50 PM ET
Jack White is made Honorary Dean by the Fermatta Music Academy in Mexico City.
Jack White is made Honorary Dean by the Fermatta Music Academy in Mexico City.
Angel Delgado/Clasos.com/LatinContent/Getty Images

Jack White has been named an Honorary Dean at the Fermatta Music Academy in Mexico City. On August 22nd, the rocker made a surprise appearance at the Academy's 20th anniversary celebration to give a speech on his family, the influence of Detroit on his life and the technical aspects of songwriting.

Find Out Where Jack White Places in Our List of 100 Greatest Guitarist

"The sense of being a musician is making art, and I do not care whether it is solo or as part of a collective project," White told the crowd, which featured over 150 students and members of the local media. "At all times, I seek to express myself, and different circumstances of my life could also become multiple creative and stylistic channels."

White was also given a Lifetime Achievement Award at the ceremony, where he was introduced by singer-songwriter Elan. He's the first musician to be awarded the Honorary Dean title in the history of the Academy.

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