.

Jack White Confronts 'Whining' Fans

Fans had posted complaints about White's label auctioning off rarities on eBay

December 1, 2010 4:59 PM ET

Jack White is pissed — this time, at his fans. It's all because, he says, he was just trying to outwit so-called "flippers" who buy limited-edition releases, only to sell them for much higher prices online. But after his Third Man label auctioned off a limited-edition White Stripes LP on eBay for $510, White Stripes fans complained — and White fired back on the forum of the label's subscription series.

"We sell a Wanda Jackson split record for 10 bucks, the eBay flipper turns around and sells it for 300," White wrote. "We're not in the business of making flippers a living. We're in the business of giving fans what they want."

He didn't stop there. "We've done giveaways, contests, auctions, etc. a lot of different ways for vault members to get first crack at limited records when we don't have to ... seriously stop all of the whining, because what you communicate to us is that all of the trouble we go to isn't worth it because nothing we do will make you happy. we'll try to do back rubs door to door when we get a chance. sincerely the staff at third man records."

[Antiquiet.com via Pitchfork]

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