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Iron and Wine Trace the Past in 'Hard Times Come Again No More' - Song Premiere

Singer-songwriter Sam Beam covers tune fron 1854

Iron & Wine
Craig Kief
March 29, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Iron and Wine's 'Hard Times Come Again No More'

Sam Beam, the singer-songwriter behind Iron and Wine, pulled inspiration from the past for his latest release, a cover of "Hard Times Come Again No More." The song was written by Stephen Foster in 1854, and its theme of love staving off sadness and suffering is still relatable. Beam's "Hard Times" is soulful, and his soft vocals pair well with the choir that supports them, especially when he whispers, "Any day that you linger around my cabin door/ Oh hard times come again no more."

Iron and Wine recorded the track for the BBC America show Copper, which centers on an Irish-American detective covering New York's Five Points neighborhood in 1865. It stars Donal Logue of Sons of Anarchy, Franka Potente of American Horror Story and Ato Essandoh of Django Unchained. The series trailer will debut during the Doctor Who premiere on BBC America on Saturday and Copper premieres on Sunday, June 23rd at 10 p.m. EST.

Iron and Wine's fifth album, Ghost on Ghost, is due out April 16th on Nonesuch. In support of the album, Beam will embark on a spring tour with dates in California, Pennsylvania, New York, Virginia, Massachusetts and Maine before he heads overseas for a European leg that wraps up in Berlin on June 5th.

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