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INVSN Drive Forward With 'Down in the Shadows'

Refused singer Dennis Lyxzen branches out with side band

Dennis Lyxzén and INVSN in the studio.
Annika Berglund
May 20, 2013 10:00 AM ET

Dennis Lyxzén was no stranger to defiant protest songs in the Swedish punks Refused, and with his band INVSN, the singer stirs up his fiery spirit for songs that chase the meaning of life. "Music for us has always been rooted in the idea of resistance. [It] always worked as a soundtrack to a different kind of life," Lyxzén tells Rolling Stone. "Either it has all the meaning in the world or it has no meaning at all and no matter what you write about, you have to do it with all you've got." On their new track "Down in the Shadows," the post-punk band hammers forward with unstoppable bass rumbles and prickly guitar accents that flower into quick synth stabs.

Photos: Dennis Lyxzen Embraces Punk Chaos in the Studio

"To stand there, hat in hand, asking to be accepted into a world where people like us were never welcome in the first place has never been an option and never will be," Lyxzén says. "Sometimes you need to remind yourself of that, then you write songs. This is one of them!"

INVSN has signed with Razor & Tie to release its still-untitled U.S. debut, which will include "Down in the Shadows" when it comes out this fall. 

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