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Husker Du Rerelease Lost 'Statues' - Song Premiere

Minneapolis punks unearth old rarity for a new generation

Hüsker Dü, 'Statues'
Mark Peterson
January 21, 2013 1:55 PM ET

Back in 1980, Hüsker Dü booked time at Minneapolis' Blackberry Way Studio, laying down tracks while eyeing a deal with Twin/Tone. However, the label signed the Replacements instead, and Hüsker Dü turned their attention to a self-released, four-song 10-inch. High costs forced the band to change formats, and they ultimately released "Amusement" and "Statues" with Reflex Records as their first seven-inch. The single was pressed twice but lost steam as Hüsker Dü shifted their musical style toward the hardcore sound that made them famous.

Hüsker Dü Photos

To celebrate Record Store Day 2013, Hüsker Dü are reissuing "Amusement" and "Statues" along with "Writer's Cramp" and "Let's Go Die," the two other Blackberry Way tracks intended for the 10-inch. It's a revealing look at Hüsker Dü that connects the dots from their obscure early years to their later greatness. The double seven-inch will be limited to 4,000 pressings and is available on April 20th.

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