.

How Lorde Broke All the Rules: Inside Rolling Stone's New Issue

The story behind the rise of pop's most unlikely new superstar

January 15, 2014 11:30 AM ET
Lorde cover rolling stone
Lorde on the cover of Rolling Stone.
Matthias Vriens-McGrath

Lorde is 17, lives with her parents and loves Sylvia Plath. She also has a worldwide smash with "Royals," four Grammy nominations and acclaim for her smart, unique debut album, Pure Heroine. How'd she become the unlikeliest superstar in pop? Contributing editor Rob Tannenbaum travels to Ella Yelich-O'Connor's New Zealand home to answer that question in our new issue (on stands Friday). 

See 20 snapshots from Lorde's Rolling Stone photo shoot

 "I get paralyzingly nervous a lot of times, so I tried bravado," Lorde explains, quoting Kanye West's "Dark Fantasy" ("Me found bravery in my bravado"). "The way I dress and carry myself, a lot of people find it intimidating. I think my whole career can be boiled down to the one word I always say in meetings: strength."

Curious about the Cramps shirt Lorde's wearing on our cover? Find out more about the punkabilly heroes

RS explores Lorde's childhood (when she ignored an adult trying to influence her artwork at the ripe age of two), tracks the crooked path "Royals" took to Number One and examines how Yelich-O'Connor has become an icon for teen girls of all stripes. "Everyone talks about Ella as the anti-Miley because she dresses like a witch and she doesn't twerk," explains Tavi Gevinson, the editor of Rookie, the definitive website for self-aware teen girls. "But it's more nuanced than that. She sings about partying, she curses like a sailor and her songs aren't completely asexual. She reflects an intelligence in girls our age, and normalizes it."

Tannenbaum tags along as Ella texts with Taylor Swift, jokingly messes with one of many fans asking for photos on the street (and then apologizes — twice), opens up about the racially-charged controversy that erupted when a photo of her embracing her boyfriend on the beach hit the blogs and chats about how she's taken control of her career and spun seemingly unpopular decisions into genius.

 "Royals" and 99 more of our favorite songs of 2013

Also in this issue: Alex Morris profiles accidental Girls star Adam Driver, Janet Reitman investigates the Tea Party's war on abortion, Mikael Gilmore remembers Phil Everly and Jeff Tietz tells the story of a cultlike prayer group with deadly secrets.

Look for the issue on stands and in the iTunes App Store this Friday, January 17th.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com