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Honduras Want to Destroy You With 'Ace' – Song Premiere

Check out the Brooklyn band's bombastic new track from their new EP

Honduras
Courtesy of Black Bell Records
February 12, 2014 8:30 AM ET

Honduras' new track "Ace" opens with some Johnny Thunders-style guitar before the band's vocalist Pat Philips takes over with a detached sounding vocal. But as the song progresses, it grows more frantic, with Philips eventually losing his cool, where he finally spits out "destroy!" during the bombastic midsection. This is punk in the classic sense – music from the balls, not the brain, that recalls the gleeful nihilism of the Dead Boys and Sex Pistols.

Rolling Stone Readers' Poll: The Best Punk Rock Bands of All Time

The Brooklyn-by-way-of-Missouri group have been blasting out DIY venues for nearly two years and on their upcoming second EP, Morality Cuts, the band explores both their primal and contemplative sides. "It was originally just an excuse to scream," Philips told Rolling Stone of "Ace." "However, the lyrics deal with the beauty and strangeness of two people focusing their attention on each other, and ignoring the rest of the world."

Morality Cuts arrives on February 25th via Black Bell Records and the band will play a local gig to support the release where there is sure to be plenty of screaming.

Stream "Ace" below: 

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