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High Winds Shut Down Electric Daisy Carnival

Dangerous weather forces closure during Calvin Harris' set

Kaskade performs during the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas.
© Erik Kabik/ erikkabik.com
June 10, 2012 1:00 PM ET

The Electric Daisy Carnival was forced to shut down early on Saturday night as high winds whipped through the Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

Shortly before 1 a.m., halfway through Calvin Harris' set, the festival's producers called a halt to the show and asked the audience to back up out of the main stage area and head toward the elevated grand stands.

"We cannot control Mother Nature and we are taking every precaution while high winds continue, and have cleared the stage areas temporarily as a preventative measure," the festival's producer, Insomniac, said in a statement. "We are asking fans to be patient inside and outside the venue while we evaluate the weather conditions."

Such precautions seem warranted by recent events: During the Indiana State Fair last August, high winds caused a stage collapse that killed 7 people and injured dozens more.

While the fate of the final day of the Electric Daisy Carnival remained in question on Saturday night, the producers announced this morning that the remainder of the event will go on as scheduled.

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