.

Henry Rollins to Host Charity Concert Featuring Dave Navarro, Corey Taylor

Black Flag frontman sounds off on Africa, Republican presidential candidates

November 30, 2011 12:05 PM ET
Henry Rollins performs a DJ set for Record Store Day at Amoeba Music in Hollywood.
Henry Rollins performs a DJ set for Record Store Day at Amoeba Music in Hollywood.
Jonathan Leibson/FilmMagic

The always-gregarious Henry Rollins will gather friends and bandmates in Los Angeles tonight (November 30th) to benefit one of his favorite charities, Drop in the Bucket. Held at the historic Avalon club, the evening will include performances by Corey Taylor of Slipknot, Dave Navarro and Stephen Perkins of Jane's Addiction, Scott Ian of Anthrax and Mike Watt of the Minutemen. Rollins' former Black Flag bandmate, Kira Roessler, will also make an appearance.

As Rollins tells Rolling Stone, "Drop in the Bucket is, very simply, a small NGO [non-governmental organization] that drills water wells and puts in the toilets and sanitation systems in schools in Southern Sudan and Uganda. I’ve actually been to Sudan and Uganda with the Drop in the Bucket team; I really wanted to be on the ground and see it for myself, so I spent about three weeks out there and watched them do the work. It’s for real."

Rollins' ties with the organization go back about four years, when founders John and Stacey Travis approached him to speak for 20 minutes at an event on water shortages. "I said, 'Yeah, I've got quite a lot to say on the water shortages. I go to Africa almost once a year, sometimes three times a year,'" he recalls. Since then, he says, "I've become part of the team."

Random Notes: Hottest Rock Pictures

This year, Rollins received assistance from Taylor in choreographing the charity's fundraiser. "It’s Corey from Slipknot who was basically our rainmaker. He stepped right up because he’s cool like that," Rollins says. "And because of Corey we got Dave Navarro, who’s a real sweetheart."

Rollins expects a good turnout at the benefit, which he notes is Drop in the Bucket's largest fundraiser to date, and is already trying to arrange its annual return to the Avalon. If it does, in fact, return next November, it will fall right after the 2012 presidential election. Never one to shy away from a debate, Rollins gave his entertaining rundown of the Republican field.

"If I was a conservative or a Republican, I would be very unhappy with the people who are representing me in those debates, all your Michelle Bachmanns and all of those, because the smartest of them are [Jon] Huntsman and [Newt] Gingrich," says Rollins. "The rest of them are just kind of odd. They’re kind of crazy and there are a lot of Republicans and conservatives in America, like gajillions of them, who are not stupid, who are not crazy, they’re not. I may disagree on points about where money should go, etc. –  that’s fair enough. But they’re not awful people and they’re a lot of things, but they’re not stupid. They must look at a guy like Herman Cain and go, 'Are you kidding me, man? Really?'"

Rollins is far more enthusiastic about the future of Drop in the Bucket. "This time next year, hopefully we’ll have, like, three major acts that’ll blow your mind," he says. "I think this thing just needs some time to grow."

Related
How Rockers Helped Free the West Memphis Three

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com