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Hear Mike Gordon of Phish's New Solo Album 'Overstep' - Premiere

Stream the bassist's latest release a full week early

Mike Gordon
Rene Huemer
February 18, 2014 8:30 AM ET

When Rolling Stone last checked in with Phish bassist Mike Gordon, he was happy to chat about his fourth solo album, Overstep, due out February 25th on Megaplum/ATO Records. He wrote the LP on weekend retreats throughout New England with his longtime collaborator, guitarist Scott Murawski, finding unusual spots to put pen to paper — like a boat, or the MASS MoCA museum, where they wrote poems based on paintings. "We had a toy drumset, little pocket gizmos, backpacking guitars," Gordon says of the crew's portable, low-key set-up.

The New Immortals: Phish

Producer Paul Q. Kolderie (Radiohead, the Pixies, Warren Zevon) helmed the album, which Gordon says is "more fun-oriented" than past efforts. "It's not an album of long jams or anything like that. I like to be kind of song-y on albums." He was drawn to Kolderie because the producer would "appreciate what was kind of quirky about it."

Gordon will be bringing Overstep to the masses with a band including Murawski (guitar), Craig Myers (percussion), Tom Cleary (keyboards) and Todd Isler (drums). Be the first to hear the full new album here:

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