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Hear Markus Schulz's Trance-Pop Journey 'Scream 2' - Album Premiere

Latest LP "represents my desire to be continually creative," DJ tells Rolling Stone

Markus Schulz
The Joelsons
February 19, 2014 8:30 AM ET

On Scream 2, DJ Markus Schulz continues to explore how trance and pop music can merge beautifully. Schulz has made a career out of melding the two sounds, releasing more than a dozen mix and remix albums in addition to producing club versions of tracks by Depeche Mode and Madonna.

Tracks like "Blown Away" and "Destino" maintain the drifting melodies of trance but add energetic, thumping beats that prepare the tunes for the club. "Revolution" finds the DJ teaming up with Venom One and Chris Maiden for a ballad, but hard-hitting beats still run the show.

Schulz tells RS he wanted to continue the trance-meets-pop experiments he'd conducted on Scream because the notoriously demanding EDM crowd positively received the daring release. "Scream 2 is a new adventure for me as an artist, because it's the first time I have undertaken an album sequel under my own name," Schulz says. "It largely picks up from where the first Scream chapter concluded and it represents my desire to be continually creative and entertain those who support me so well. I hope this is an album that will resonate and embrace the world."

Scream 2 is out February 21st and Schulz goes on tour at the same time.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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