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Hear Kenny Chesney and Grace Potter's New Duet

Country superstar and Vermont rocker team up for 'You and Tequila,' off Chesney's forthcoming 'Hemingway's Whiskey'

September 14, 2010 10:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Kenny Chesney You And Tequila.

Country superstar Kenny Chesney won't release his new album Hemingway's Whiskey until September 28th, but Rolling Stone has your exclusive listen to one of the album's standout tracks "You and Tequila," a duet with Grace Potter. "I was looking for someone to do the song with me ‹ I listened to all kinds of music and there was this girl whose voice I just fell in love with," Chesney says of the pairing. "I didn't really know anything about her, I just knew I loved her singing and I loved her records, and her name was Grace Potter."

Grace Potter and the Nocturnals were named to Rolling Stone's Best New Bands of 2010. "I love singing beautiful songs, that's all I care about ‹ this is the first time that on the very first listen I immediately picked up the phone and said 'Make this happen,'" Potter says. Check out the track and the story behind "You and Tequila" above.

Hemingway's Whiskey
1. "The Boys of Fall"
2. "Live A Little"
3. "Coastal"
4. "You And Tequila" (featuring Grace Potter)
5. "Seven Days"
6. "Small Y'all" (Duet with George Jones)
7. "Where I Grew Up"
8. "Reality"
9. "Round And Round"
10. "Somewhere With You"
11. "Hemingway's Whiskey"

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

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