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Hayes Moves Past Savage Garden

First solo album due in the spring

November 27, 2001 12:00 AM ET

Former Savage Garden singer Darren Hayes will release his debut album, Spin, in early spring. The album, which features the single "Insatiable," is the first solo project to come in the wake of the Australian pop duo's (Hayes and Daniel Jones) recent split.

"It's a much more sophisticated and lush version of everything I've done before," says Hayes, who cites the electronic flavor of recent Madonna and Bjork albums as inspirations. "It's a very romantic record, a very sexy record," he says. "And it's more personal. This is the music I hear in my head."

Savage Garden producer Walter Afanasieff returns to the boards, but Hayes is no longer aiming to fit the dance-pop image of his former band. "I felt like I had painted myself into a bit of a corner," he says. "I have no idea if the new record will sell, but, for me personally, it's an album that I've wanted to make since I've been making records."

Savage Garden split up in October after nearly five years together. The group released their self-titled debut in 1997, scoring hit singles with "I Want You," "To the Moon and Back" and "Truly Madly Deeply," which became a Number One hit. Savage Garden released their second album, Affirmation, in 1999.

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