.

Harrison Reissues Due

Box set to collect best of solo material

January 15, 2004 12:00 AM ET

Five studio albums George Harrison recorded for his own Dark Horse label, most of which have been out of print for years, will be reissued on February 24th along with a box set covering the same span.

The Dark Horse Years 1976-1992, includes 1976's 33 1/3, 1979's George Harrison, 1981's Somewhere in England, 1982's Gone Troppo and Cloud Nine, which broke into the Top Ten in 1987. The box also contains 1992's Live in Japan, a set in which Harrison performed songs from his solo career as well as his Beatles highlights backed by Eric Clapton and his band. Each record contains bonus tracks, and the box is augmented with a seventy-five-minute DVD featuring live clips and promotional footage. Also included is a history of Dark Horse Records by Harrison's wife Olivia and liner notes by Rolling Stone's David Fricke.

The remastered albums will also be issued separate from the set.

Harrison died of cancer in November 2001. His final album, 2002's Brainwashed (which was his first batch of new songs in fifteen years), continues to fare well. The record is nominated for three Grammy Awards, which will be presented on February 8th in Los Angeles.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com