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Harrison Reissues Due

Box set to collect best of solo material

January 15, 2004 12:00 AM ET

Five studio albums George Harrison recorded for his own Dark Horse label, most of which have been out of print for years, will be reissued on February 24th along with a box set covering the same span.

The Dark Horse Years 1976-1992, includes 1976's 33 1/3, 1979's George Harrison, 1981's Somewhere in England, 1982's Gone Troppo and Cloud Nine, which broke into the Top Ten in 1987. The box also contains 1992's Live in Japan, a set in which Harrison performed songs from his solo career as well as his Beatles highlights backed by Eric Clapton and his band. Each record contains bonus tracks, and the box is augmented with a seventy-five-minute DVD featuring live clips and promotional footage. Also included is a history of Dark Horse Records by Harrison's wife Olivia and liner notes by Rolling Stone's David Fricke.

The remastered albums will also be issued separate from the set.

Harrison died of cancer in November 2001. His final album, 2002's Brainwashed (which was his first batch of new songs in fifteen years), continues to fare well. The record is nominated for three Grammy Awards, which will be presented on February 8th in Los Angeles.

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