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Half Moon Run Blend Voices on 'Dark Eyes' – Album Premiere

Canadian indie band readies its debut LP

Half Moon Run
Valeria Cherchi
July 16, 2013 8:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Half Moon Run's "Dark Eyes"

Half Moon Run have gained widespread recognition by opening for bands like Mumford & Sons, Of Monsters and Men and Metric. Now the Canadian indie rockers step out on their own with Dark Eyes, their LP debut.

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Anchored by Devon Portielje, all four members harmonize on songs with measured, gentle guitar arrangements that lend the album a mellow, ethereal feel. The music varies widely, from keyboard-driven tracks like "Judgement" and "She Wants to Know" to cryptic lyrics dealing with addiction on "Full Circle" and "Drug You." The cheery "Call Me in the Afternoon" masks somber lyrical content with subtle folk instrumentation.

Half Moon Run will tour extensively this summer. They will play all three of Mumford & Sons' U.S. Gentlemen of the Road Stopovers. The band will also be on the summer festival circuit, including performances at Lollapalooza and Leeds Festival.

Dark Eyes will be released in the U.S. on July 23rd. You can preorder it on iTunes.

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