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Grammys Induct Jimi Hendrix, Queen Recordings Into Hall Of Fame

December 1, 2008 4:07 PM ET

Jimi Hendrix, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Police, Queen and Ennio Morricone were among those whose music was inducted into the Grammys Hall of Fame. Specifically, Hendrix's famed Woodstock rendition of "Star-Spangled Banner," Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" and 26 more recordings were all honored and will be featured in the Grammys' brand new Los Angeles museum, set to open December 6th. Queen's "We Will Rock You/We Are The Champions," Police's entire Synchronicity, Morricone's The Good, The Bad & The Ugly soundtrack, Stevie Wonder's "For Once In My Life" and the "Love Theme" from The Godfather were also selected. Additionally, B.B. King and John Mayer will perform one of the new inductees, Louis Jordan's "Let The Good Times Roll," at this Wednesday's nominations ceremony. Since 1973, the Grammys commission has inducted 826 titles into the Hall of Fame.

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

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