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Gov't Mule Do More Voodoo

Haynes and Co. cover Van Morrison, David Gray on new CD

May 12, 2005 12:00 AM ET

Warren Haynes just doesn't know when to stop. When he's not touring with his own band, Gov't Mule, he's with the Allman Brothers. And when he's not with the Allman Brothers, he's with the Dead. A member of all those bands, Haynes still manages to find time to spend in the studio -- even when he's not releasing a new album.

Although Gov't Mule's latest disc, Deja Voodoo, was only released this past September, Haynes decided to re-release it next month, retro-bundling the album with a bonus CD -- primarily because the band recently laid down five more tracks. Fans who already own a copy of Deja Voodoo will be able to download a free copy of the bonus disc by utilizing Sony Connected technology.

"I think, more than anything, we just felt like we needed to record some songs," says Haynes. "And I'd rather put it out now, while it's fresh, than sit on it for six months." Entitled Mo' Voodoo, the bonus disc will feature the originals "I'll Be the One" and "I Can't Be You," along with covers of David Gray's "My Oh My," Joe Henry's "King's Highway" and Van Morrison's "Ballerina."

In April, Deja Voodoo won a Jammy Award for Studio Album of the Year. Haynes will finish the current round of Allman Brothers tour dates before launching the Voodoo Caravan Tour with Gov't Mule on June 3rd.

The band recently headlined two nights at the Orpheum Theatre in New Orleans, during the city's annual Jazz and Heritage Festival. In keeping with Mule's Jazz Fest tradition, the shows featured many all-star jams, featuring appearances by Dave Matthews, Les Claypool, David Hidalgo and members of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band.

"There are a lot of people left that I would like to work with in one capacity or another," says Haynes, looking ahead. "But that list is getting smaller and smaller."

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