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Glen Campbell Charged

Country star faces assault and drunken driving counts

December 2, 2003 12:00 AM ET

Glen Campbell has been formally charged with aggravated assault, extreme drunken driving, drunken driving and leaving the scene of an accident by the Maricopa County Attorney's office following a November 24th car accident and arrest.

The country-pop legend was arrested at his home after his BMW allegedly struck a Toyota Camry at an intersection in Phoenix. A witness followed Campbell's car to his home and notified police who arrested the sixty-seven-year-old singer. As Campbell was being processed at police headquarters, he allegedly kneed a sergeant in the leg, prompting the assault charge. According to court documents, his blood-alcohol level was .20; the legal limit in Arizona is .08 and .15 constitutes "extreme."

Campbell posted $2,000 bail at the time of his arrest and was released. Two days later he issued a public apology and blamed the incident on a mix of alcohol and an anti-anxiety drug. Campbell had battled drug and alcohol abuse in the past. "I fell off the wagon," he told the Arizona Republic after the arrest. "I think that old wagon, if I fall off it again, it'll run me right over."

The aggravated assault charge is a felony, while the other three are all misdemeanors.

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