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Glee' Creator Talks Bullying, 'GQ' Photo Scandal

Creator Ryan Murphy says Tuesday's bully plot will continue in future episodes

November 10, 2010 12:08 PM ET

On Tuesday's episode of Glee Kurt finally confronted the bully who has been harassing him since the beginning of the series — and found out he was a closeted homosexual. In an interview with the New York Times , Glee creator Ryan Murphy said it's the beginning of a long story arc in which many of the New Directions kids finally confront their tormentors.

"As we get deeper into the episodes, it will be about how all the other kids are tortured and bullied," Murphy told the Times. "The kid in the wheelchair. The Jewish girl. Because they stick up for Kurt, they will all get increasingly tormented. So it's not just about gay bullying — it's about all different kinds that happen in schools."

Glee Playback: Rocky Horror Glee Show Best Episode Yet

Murphy says he's planned on addressing high school bullying from the beginning of the series, but the recent rash of teenage suicides and the It Gets Better campaign have made it even more important. "It really did ignite the cast and the crew to do their best and push themselves with the story," Murphy said.

Murphy also commented on the controversy surrounding the racy GQ photo spread. "That photo shoot was not about the show," he said. "It was about the individuals in the show. They were actors, off the set, being personalities."

Read our story "Glee Gone Wild: The Dark Side of TV's Most Popular Show"

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Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
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