.

Gary Barlow, Wife Dawn 'Devastated' After Daughter Is Stillborn

U.K. 'X Factor' judge asks for privacy during 'painful time'

August 7, 2012 9:30 AM ET
gary barlow
Gary Barlow
Tommy Jackson/WireImage

British singer-songwriter and X Factor U.K. judge Gary Barlow and his wife, Dawn, are "devastated" following the stillborn birth of their baby daughter, Reuters reports.

"Poppy Barlow was delivered stillborn on August 4th in London," Barlow said in a statement. "Our focus now is giving her a beautiful funeral and loving our three children with all our hearts. We'd ask at this painful time that our privacy be respected." 

The couple had announced earlier this year that they were expecting their fourth child. The Barlows, who married in 2000, have three children: Daniel, 11; Emily, 10; and Daisy, who is three. 

Recently, Barlow – whose music career took off in the Nineties when he was the lead singer of the popular boy band Take That helped organize a concert as part of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee celebration in June, when he and English pop singer Cheryl Cole performed a duet of Lady Antebellum's "Need You Now." Barlow also received an Order of the British Empire award during the Diamond Jubilee festivities.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com