.

Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood Tie Knot

Nashville stars wed in Oklahoma

December 12, 2005 12:00 AM ET

Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood were married this Saturday before family members at their home in Oklahoma, where Brooks was born.

Last May, Brooks proposed to fellow Nashville star Yearwood in front of an audience of 7,000 at the Legends of Bronze event -- at which Brooks, Willie Nelson, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley and others were honored -- at Buck Owen's Crystal Palace in Bakersfield, California.

The two first met through the music industry in the mid-Eighties, and Yearwood became the opener on Brooks' first headlining tour. Brooks sang backing vocals on "Like We Never Had a Broken Heart" off Yearwood's self-titled debut, and she went on to sing on most of his releases. In 1997, the two won a Grammy for Best Country Collaboration With Vocals for "In Another's Eyes."

Brooks said of the wedding, "It's the perfect Christmas gift to each other. We could not be happier."

This is the second marriage for Brooks, 43, and the third for Yearwood, 41. Brooks ended his marriage to college girlfriend Sandy Mahl in 2000; Yearwood was previously married to Christopher Latham and musician Robert Reynolds.

Three-time Grammy winner Yearwood recently released Jasper County, now nominated for Grammys for Best Country Album and Best Country Vocal Performance. Two-time Grammy winner Brooks, now retired from the music industry, still holds the title of biggest-selling solo artist of all time. Wal-Mart is now set to reissue his entire catalog. His last studio effort, 2001's Scarecrow, went triple platinum.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com