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Gang Starr Bows At No. 6

April 9, 1998 12:00 AM ET

With their first record in four years, the rap team of DJ Premier and lyricist Guru -- together known as Gang Starr -- storm the top ten this week with Moment of Truth, which debuts at No. 6, for the week ending April 5th. The week's highest debut, Moment sold 97,000 copies, according to SoundScan.

That was just enough to surpass the week's other big rap debut, Daz Dillinger's Retaliation, Revenge & Get Back, which bows at No. 8. The arrival of Gang Starr and Daz Dillinger gives this week's Top 10 a distinctly schizophrenic feel, nearly evenly split between sweet pop and street hip-hop.

First week sales news wasn't nearly as good for some others. Stone Temple Pilots lead singer Scott Weiland's 12 Bar Blues comes in at a shaky No. 42, selling 29,000 copies. The fact that Weiland has not been able to land his first single, "Barbarella," in heavy rotation on either mainstream or modern rock stations (not to mention MTV) no doubt hurt early sales. Further down the chart, U.K press rock darlings Pulp debut at a distant No. 114 with This is Hardcore.

Meanwhile, among those on the way up the chart this week are Cherry Poppin Daddies' Zoot Suit Riot (No. 67 to 62), Jon B.'s Cool Relax (No. 92 to 73), Fastball's All The Pain Money Can Buy (No. 115 to 85) and the Barenaked Ladies' Rock Spectacle (No. 108 to 92).

From the top, it was the soundtrack to Titanic at No. 1 (selling 390,000 copies, the first time in eleven weeks it dipped below the 400,000 mark), followed by Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love (197,000); Savage Garden (113,000); Madonna's Ray of Light (104,000); Backstreet Boys (101,000); Moment of Truth (97,000); Eric Clapton's Pilgrim (85,000); Retaliation, Revenge & Get Back (84,000); K-Ci & Jo Jo's Love Always (79,000); and C-Murder's Life Or Death (72,000).

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

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