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Furnishings From Michael Jackson's Final Home Sell for $1M

Items included personalized armoire, paintings

December 19, 2011 8:40 AM ET
A preview of the auction for the contents of Michael Jackson's home by Julien's Auctions
A preview of the auction for the contents of Michael Jackson's home by Julien's Auctions
Splash News

The contents of the Los Angeles mansion where Michael Jackson died in 2009 were sold at an auction for close to $1 million over the weekend. The auction consisted mainly of paintings, furniture and miscellaneous decorations from the rented home, but some items, such as upholstered chairs from his "medication room" smeared with the singer's makeup and a chalkboard on which one of his children wrote "I (heart) Daddy. SMILE, it's for free," offered a window into the pop icon's personal life in his final days.

One of the top-selling items was a Victorian Revival-style bedroom suite featuring an armoire with a message from the singer written in felt pen – "Train, perfection March April Full out May" - referring to his rehearsals for his planned series of comeback concerts in London.

The auction was originally going to include the ornate headboard for the bed in which Jackson's body was found, but the bed was removed from the sale at the request of the singer's family.

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