Fricke's Picks Radio: Going Long With the Seeds, Stones and Mothers

Rolling Stones
Getty Images.
Rolling Stones.
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The running joke about long album tracks in the late Sixties was they gave FM DJs a chance to take a bathroom break, roll some good smoke or enjoy an intimate moment with a studio guest. But free-form rock radio was an idea yet to be launched when the Rolling Stones, the Seeds, Love, the Blues Project and Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention cut and/or released these breakthrough clockbusters in 1966, pretty much in this order. Note: "Up in Her Room" was on the Seeds' second LP, A Web of Sound. Spotify, drawing on a double-up reissue of the group's first two albums, doesn't make that distinction.

Rare and Intimate Pictures of the Rolling Stones

The Stones' "Going Home" was actually recorded in December 1965, while Love's "Revelation," laid down several months later at the same Los Angeles studio, evolved from a jamming feature of their club sets, dubbed "John Lee Hooker" after his style of endless boogie. The Mothers taped the side-long "underground oratorios" on 1967's Absolutely Free in late '66, shortly before quitting the police-state crush of L.A.'s Sunset Strip for poverty and experiment in New York, with Zappa leaving big room on Side One (seven tracks of scathing vegetable-gag dada) for his first, major guitar soloing on an album.

Another note: The exquisite, opening miniature here was also recorded in 1966 – a world away from this electric mayhem, in Coimbra, Portugal by the master fado guitarist Carlos Paredes.