.

Freddie Mercury Meets Wolverine in Lost Comics Page

Rejected page features Queen frontman and X-Men antihero

April 25, 2012 3:30 PM ET
Via Comics Alliance

Sci-fi blog io9 has unearthed a comic book page featuring Wolverine and Queen frontman Freddie Mercury drawn by an unknown artist as a submission to Marvel Comics at some point in the Nineties. The page depicts the X-Men antihero prowling through the woods only to stumble upon the Queen singer standing in a confident pose.

The only dialogue on the page has Wolverine uttering "Freddy [sic] Mercury?," because, really, what else would you say if you unexpectedly ran into the Queen singer a few years after his death? Also, obviously, Wolverine must be wondering what Mercury is doing in a comic book to begin with.

The page has been in circulation online for some time. Back in 2010, former Marvel Comics staffer Steve Bunche shared the page on his blog, saying that while the art was not up to snuff for the top superhero comics publisher, he admired the artist's imagination. "Seriously, how the fuck does someone even make the leap in narrative logic from depicting Wolverine stalking through the forest to having him run into Freddie Mercury of Queen for no apparent reason?" Bunche wrote. "That, dear readers, is a sign of true creativity."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Via Comics Alliance
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com