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Frank Ocean Describes Relief He Felt After Coming Out

'I hadn't been happy in so long,' R&B singer says

Frank Ocean performs at the Oya music festival on August 9th, 2012 in Oslo.
Grott, Vegard/AFP/GettyImages
November 21, 2012 9:55 AM ET

Frank Ocean says he "cried like a fucking baby" this summer after acknowledging he is gay in a letter on Tumblr, the singer says in the December issue of GQ. Ocean said that though the massive relief he felt at the time has given way to other emotions, he remains buoyed by having publicly revealed his sexuality. "It was like all the frequency just clicked to a change in my head. All the receptors were now receiving a different signal, and I was happy," the singer says. "I hadn't been happy in so long. I've been sad again since, but it's a totally different take on sad. There's just some magic in truth and honesty and openness."

His openess doesn't include entertaining labels about his sexuality, and Ocean pointed rejected the term "bisexual" to describe himself. "You can move to the next question," he said. "I'll respectfully say that life is dynamic and comes along with dynamic experiences, and the same sentiment that I have towards genres of music, I have towards a lot of labels and boxes and shit." For Ocean, sex and sexuality take a back seat to romance. "I'm not a centerfold. I'm not trying to sell you sex," he said. "I didn't need to label it for it to have impact. Because people realize everything that I say is so relatable, because when you're talking about romantic love, both sides in all scenarios feel the same shit."

Still, Ocean feared the open letter might have derailed his career, even noting how common it was to hear homophobic comments from his family, even his mother, when he was growing up. "In black music, we've got so many leaps and bounds to make with acceptance and tolerance in regard to that issue. It reflects something just ingrained, you know," he said. "Some of my heroes coming up talk recklessly like that. It's tempting to give those views and words –  that ignorance –  more attention than they deserve."

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