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Foxy Brown Mooning Charges Dropped

Judge dismissed case against rapper when plaintiff refused to testify

July 12, 2011 3:15 PM ET
Foxy Brown mooning
Foxy Brown
Johnny Nunez/WireImage

A judge in Brooklyn has dropped charges that rapper Foxy Brown violated a court order by mooning her neighbor. Assistant District Attorney Robert Isdith opted to scrap the case after the neighbor, Irene Raymond, told prosecutors that she would not testify in the trial.

"While the district attorney's office has no doubt the defendant committed this crime, we have no other choice but to dismiss this case," Isdith said in a statement.

Photos: Rock Star Mug Shots

After Isdith dropped the case, Brown told reporters that she had been "falsely arrested twice, slanted and defamed," and described Raymond – who has had a restraining order against her in place since 2008 – as a jealous woman with a "borderline obsession" with the rapper. According to prosecutors, Brown broke the protective order by baring her underwear-clad ass to Raymond while screaming an obscenity during a confrontation in July of last year.

The rapper's attorney Salvatore Strazzulo told NBC News that if the case had gone to trial, he would have argued that Brown did not moon the plaintiff and was not actually wearing underwear at the time, proving that Raymond was lying. Strazzulo will soon file a civil suit in Brooklyn alleging that Raymond engaged in malicious prosecution against Brown.

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