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Foo Fighters Team With Butch Vig for "Heaviest Album Yet"

March 8, 2010 11:03 AM ET

Forget all that talk of a hiatus. The Foo Fighters are getting ready to head back into the studio, Dave Grohl revealed at the Independent Spirit Awards on Friday night. Swigging from a bottle of Jameson Irish Whiskey, the Foos frontman and Them Crooked Vultures drummer, who had just introduced a performance by Best Documentary subjects Anvil, said his band will work with Butch Vig on their seventh album, in part to mark the 20th anniversary of Nirvana's Nevermind, which Vig produced in 1991. "Me and [Foos drummer] Taylor [Hawkins] have already started demoing songs," Grohl told Rolling Stone.

Read our interview with Dave Grohl on the making of Nevermind.

But unlike the Foos' previous two efforts, which were recorded at Studio 606 (a cutting edge recording complex/rehearsal space/party den that the band owns in Northridge, California), this forthcoming album will be recorded entirely in analog — and out of Grohl's garage. "We're doing a test on Monday," he said when asked about potential noise complaints from his Encino neighbors (and the missus). Indeed, the father of two added, "I think this could be our heaviest album yet."

With no firm timeline for release (though the month September was bandied about), the follow-up to 2007's Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace will also be accompanied by a documentary film, said Grohl, that will celebrate the Foos' 16 years together and chronicle the making of the album. No doubt he was inspired by the movie Anvil! The Story of Anvil. For his Independent Spirit introduction, Grohl went off script and urged not just all musicians, but every person in the room to watch the movie that made him cry.

Check out our best photos of Foo Fighters, onstage and off.

Nervous that his ad-libbing didn't come out as well as he'd hoped, afterwards, Grohl clutched his bottle like a security blanket, while waiting for his wife Jordyn to peruse the tent-adjacent Elle Lounge. "If I stay another minute, I'm gonna get so fucking drunk, I'll barf all over myself," he cracked.

Related Stories:
Foo Fighters' Grohl Says Greatest Hits Feels Like "An Obituary"
Dave Grohl Says He Never Meant For Foo Fighters "To Be a Career"

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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