.

Flying Lotus Crafts a Heart-Racing Mix for 'Grand Theft Auto V'

Listen to an exclusive set from the video game soundtrack

Flying Lotus
Courtesy Rockstar Games
September 27, 2013 9:30 AM ET

Flying Lotus takes on Grand Theft Auto V with a brand-new mix for the game. "Fly Lo FM" includes songs from Outkast and Tyler, the Creator, in addition to mixes by the British dance favorite Lotus himself – and it won't be available for purchase.

Inside the 'Grand Theft Auto V' Soundtrack: Wavves, Flying Lotus, Tyler, the Creator and More

The mix features seductive tracks with hip-swaying beats and trouble-stirring rhythms perfect for the racing game. Check it out here. You can get The Music of Grand Theft Auto V here.

 

"Fly Lo FM" Tracklisting:
Flying Lotus "Getting There (featuring Niki Randa)"
Clams Casino "Crystals"
Flying Lotus "Crosswerved"
Flying Lotus "Bespin"
Flying Lotus "See Thru 2 U"
Flying Lotus "The Diddler"
Flying Lotus "Comptuer Face Remix"
Hudson Mohawke "100hm"
Flying Lotus "The Kill (featuring Niki Randa)"
Outkast "Elevators"
Captain Murphy "Evil Grin"
Flying Lotus "Catapult Man"
Dabrye "Encoded Flow"
Tyler, the Creator "Garbage"
Flying Lotus "Like Yesterday"
Machinedrum "She Died There"
DJ Rashad "Fuck T-Why"
Thundercat "O Shiet It's X"
Flying Lotus "Stonecutters"
Shadow Child "23"
Kingdom "Stalker"
Aphex Twin – "Windowlicker"

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com