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Flaming Lips Wield 'Peace Sword' on New EP

Band's upcoming release is based on 'Ender's Game' novel

The Flaming Lips perform in Newport, Isle of Wight.
Caitlin Mogridge/Getty Images
September 30, 2013 11:55 AM ET

The Flaming Lips are preparing to put out an EP based on the themes from Ender's Game. The band had previously signed on to write a song for the film adaptation of the popular novel by Orson Scott Card, and decided to extend the project to a full-length album, Stereogum reports. 

The EP will be called Peace Sword, and while no songs have been released yet, a few titles have been shared, including "Think Like a Machine, Not a Boy," "Wolf Children" and "Assassin Beetle/The Dream Is Ending." 

Where Does the Flaming Lips' 'Do You Realize??' Rank on Our 100 Best Songs of the 2000s List?

The Ender's Game author has come under fire recently for his condemnation of same-sex marriage, and Wayne Coyne recently shared the Flaming Lips' association on Instagram.

"Our involvement is only with the music directors of the movie . . . but yeah . . . these are conflicts all big projects have to deal with. We try to do cool things with cool people that, obviously benefit us and the cool people we doing stuff with" [sic], the post reads. "Occasionally these benefits extend to abstractly connected people who are NOT so cool.. So we try to choose .."

Peace Sword is due out on November 29th, and Ender's Game hits theaters on November 1st.

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