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FBI Releases Whitney Houston Records

Files show three investigations in 1988, 1992, 1999

Whitney Houston
David Corio/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
March 4, 2013 4:35 PM ET

The FBI has released its records regarding three investigations conducted by the bureau on behalf of Whitney Houston. The files show the FBI investigated an alleged extortion attempt in 1992 but determined no crime occurred. Agents also looked into possible criminal threats against Houston in fan mail sent to the FBI in 1988 and 1999, but found no evidence of the threats.

100 Greatest Singers: Whitney Houston

According to the Associated Press, the 128-page file doesn't contain any new personal details of the late singer. Though Houston was interviewed at the New Jersey offices of her management company regarding the extortion attempt, the FBI's records on the investigation are heavily redacted.

Houston was found dead on February 11th, 2012. Her death was ruled an accidental drowning, but authorities also said her death was complicated by cocaine use and heart disease.

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