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Fats Domino Missing

New Orleans legend hasn't been heard from since Sunday

September 1, 2005 12:00 AM ET

Three days after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans, rock legend Fats Domino is missing, according to his longtime agent.

Al Embry, who has worked with Domino (born Antoine Dominique) for twenty-eight years, told the Associated Press that he has been unable to contact the singer since Sunday evening. According to Embry, Domino, the Rock & Roll Hall of Famer best known for the classic singles "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame," planned to stay at his New Orleans home in the Ninth Ward -- which is now underwater -- with his wife Rosemary and daughter.

"I hope somebody turns him up, but as of right now, we haven't got anybody that knows where he's at," Embry said. "I would think he might be safe because somebody said he was on top of the balcony."

The seventy-seven-year-old Domino, who scored a hit in 1960 with "Walking to New Orleans," was born and raised in the city, where he has remained a staple on the club scene and has influenced generations of performers.

"He's a national treasure," New Orleans singer-songwriter Shannon McNally said yesterday through tears. "We need to find him, and all those beautiful people."

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