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Exclusive Video From Springsteen Concert DVD

See "Racing in the Street" from new DVD capturing epic festival set

June 18, 2010 5:30 PM ET

Next Tuesday, Bruce Springsteen's London Calling:  Live in Hyde Park — a complete concert taped in England last June — arrives on DVD and Blu-ray (click above for an exclusive clip of "Racing in the Street"). The concert went down in front of a festival crowd and Gaslight Anthem singer Brian Fallon joined the band for "No Surrender," but the film's editor says what makes the show truly remarkable is its incredible lighting.

"It's a combination of the stage lighting and the daylight," Thom Zimmy tells Rolling Stone. "When you get to 'Jungleland' and 'American Land' you get a sense of the day passing into night."

Like most shows on the group's 2009 tour, the show features Springsteen and the E Street Band playing unrehearsed fan requests. "You literally see him changing the set list," says Zimmy. "If you look back with Bruce's DVDs, they all have a very specific look. Bruce is really involved in the lighting and the look of the DVD, from Live in New York to Live in Dublin. They're all really different. What I like about this one is that it captures Bruce directing the band and the massive scale of the audience."

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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