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Exclusive Premiere: Bryan Ferry's "You Can Dance" Video

New album 'Olympia' features first team-up with Brian Eno since 1973

July 19, 2010 9:49 AM ET

On October 26th, Bryan Ferry returns with a new solo album Olympia, which finds the Roxy Music frontman reuniting with bandmates Phil Manzanera, Andy Mackay and Brian Eno. It's the first time the four members of the group's classic lineup have performed on an album since Roxy's classic 1973 album For Your Pleasure. Ferry also roped in big-name collaborators including David Gilmour, Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood, Flea and Scissor Sisters for the LP, which includes covers of tracks by Traffic and Tim Buckley. (Ferry is no stranger to reinterpreting classic rock: his last album, Dylanesque, was a collection of Bob Dylan covers.) To gear up for the album's release, Rolling Stone has an exclusive premiere of the video for lead single "You Can Dance." In the clip, Ferry croons the sultry electro-pop number as sexy female dancers writhe and jiggle in what looks like the hottest members-only nightclub ever. Check it out above.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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