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Exclusive Download: Louise Burns' 'Drop Names Not Bombs'

Get the former Lillix member's cheerful new tune

August 31, 2011 4:30 PM ET
louise burns drop names not bombs
Louise Burns 'Drop Names Not Bombs'
Courtesy of Light Organ Records

Click here to listen to Louise Burns' "Drop Names Not Bombs"

As a member of the former all-girl rock band Lillix, Vancouver-based pop singer Louise Burns spent her teenage years writing very commercial pop songs. Now she's returning to the music world with her debut solo album, Mellow Drama, which is her take on making fun music once again. Her latest track, the warm "Drop Names Not Bombs" is Burns' commentary on the music industry she experienced when she was younger. Burns explains to Rolling Stone that "as a teen pop star on the edge of obscurity, I've seen my fair share of 'industry' parties where music 'industry' types speak in the language of name dropping in hopes to raise their social status." Burns feels that "everyone gets their fifteen minutes, some are just more creative with what they do with it than others." Mellow Drama will be in stores on September 6th, but you can download "Drop Names Not Bombs" for free here.

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