Exclusive: Buffalo Springfield Plans to Reunite for Fall Tour

Band friend David Crosby confirms group will hit the road for the first time since 1968: 'Personally, I’d like to go watch'

Barry Brecheisen/FilmMagic
Richie Furay and Neil Young of Buffalo Springfield perform at Neil Young's 24th Annual Bridge School Benefit Concert at Shoreline Amphitheatre on October 24, 2010 in Mountain View, California
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Since Buffalo Springfield reunited at last year’s Bridge School Benefit in Mountain View, California, there have been rumors the band will tour for the first time since their break-up in 1968. Now longtime band friend David Crosby confirms it: original members Neil Young, Stephen Stills and Richie Furay will hit the road this fall.

“I think he is excited,” Crosby says of CSN bandmate Stephen Stills. “And I’ve got to tell you, I didn’t get to see them live, but I watched clips and Richie [Furay]- I got to tell you man, he is so happy onstage and is such a joyful energy.”

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Crosby continues, “He really sparked that thing, and I think it was a very pleasant experience for Neil and Stephen both. I know they’re going to go out for at least some dates in the fall. Personally, I’d like to go watch. They’re one of my favorite bands.”

Furay’s manager David Spero tells Rolling Stone, “There certainly are discussions to that effect.”

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Crosby has an idea how to make the tour even more special: “I wish I could throw it in with the Byrds,” he says, referring to his old band. “That would be my dream, because everybody and their uncle would come to see the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield. But that’s not going to happen.” Why not? “Roger [McGuinn] is pretty adamant about that. He’s very happy about being a folksinger; he likes it, and wants it that way.”

The Byrds originally broke up in 1973, but McGuinn, bass player Chris Hillman and Crosby staged a series of reunion shows between 1988 and 1990. They recorded four new songs in for a Byrds box set in 1990 and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991. Since then, original members Gene Clark and Michael Clarke passed away.

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"It’s pretty obvious that [Buffalo Springfield and The Byrds] would be a great show,” Crosby says. “You can’t have everything, though. People in hell want ice water.”

It’s unclear whether the Springfield has plans to record new material, but Crosby isn’t optimistic. “I doubt it,” he says. “I don’t think they have the material. But then again, Neil can write five songs in one week, damn him. I wish I could. Anything’s possible. I know all three of those guys are still writing, so you can say anything.”

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At the Bridge School benefit, Furay, Young and Stills reunited for a moving 12-song set, joined by drummer Joe Vitale filling in for the late Dewey Martin and Young’s longtime bassist Rick Rosas replacing the late Bruce Palmer. The band mixed hits (“For What It’s Worth,” “Rock and Roll Woman,” “Mr. Soul”) with deep cuts (“Burned,” “Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing”) from their brief three-year career.   

The original five Springfield members attempted to reform on three separate occasions in the Eighties, but “there just wasn’t a flow,” Furay said in September. But he was optimistic days after the reunion show last year. “I’m never going to say never again,” he told Rolling Stone. “From our perspective, we left with the idea that we can do this if we want to.”

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