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Exclusive Audio: Jimi Hendrix Covers Bob Dylan's 'Tears Of Rage'

Plus, see a new video for 1967's 'Love Or Confusion'

November 11, 2010 10:54 AM ET

Click to listen to Jimi Hendrix's Tears Of Rage.

Years before Jimi Hendrix became a superstar when he set his guitar on fire at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, he was a session guitarist for R&B legends like the Isley Brothers, Little Richard and Don Covay. West Coast Seattle Boy, a new four-disc set that traces Hendrix's entire career, devotes its first CD to the fascinating songs that show how Hendrix learned his craft. The rest of the collection consists of unreleased versions of familiar songs like "Fire" and "Are You Experienced," alongside obscurities like "Mastermind" and "In From The Storm."

Read David Fricke on Hendrix's last days and lost music

Most interesting is this tender cover of Bob Dylan and The Band's classic "This Wheel's On Fire" — which you can exclusively hear here. Also, check out this exclusive video for an alternate version of 1967's "Love Or Confusion."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
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