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Ex-LAPD Detective Implicates Puffy, Suge Knight in Tupac-Biggie Slayings

New book 'Murder Rap' alleges suppressed evidence

October 4, 2011 12:30 PM ET
notorious b.i.g. biggie smalls tupac shakur 2pac lapd murder
Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac Shakur
Photos by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage

An ex-LAPD detective who was removed from the double investigation into the murders of rival rappers Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls is claiming he has proof that Sean "Puffy" Combs and Suge Knight are to blame for ordering the murders. In a new self-published book called Murder Rap, the former detective, Greg Kading, alleges that the LAPD suppressed evidence, including taped confessions from hired hitmen, and removed him from the case just as he was on the verge of solving it.

Sean Combs wrote in an email to LA Weekly, "This story is pure fiction and completely ridiculous." Shakur, who recorded for Knight's Death Row Records, was gunned down in Las Vegas in September 1996; Smalls (Christopher Wallace), Combs' friend and colleague, was shot and killed six months later in Los Angeles. 

Related
The Unsolved Mystery of the Notorious B.I.G.
Biggie Mistrial Declared

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