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Ex-Crazy Town Guitarist Dead

Pre)thing frontman Rust Epique was thirty-five

March 10, 2004 12:00 AM ET
Rust Epique, the lead singer, songwriter and guitarist for hard-rock band Pre)thing, died Monday night in his Las Vegas home of an apparent heart attack; he was thirty-five. Rust and his band were on their way to stardom when the tragedy struck; Pre)thing's debut album, 22nd Century Lifestyle, is scheduled for release on V2 Records on April 6th, and their first single, "Faded Love" is quickly moving up the Modern Rock charts. In fact, the song has been one of Active Rock Radio's most added tracks in the last two weeks.

Rust was no stranger to the rock & roll lifestyle, and actually left his post as guitarist for platinum selling rap-metal band Crazy Town because he was allegedly too crazy for his ex-bandmates. A notorious and well-loved eccentric in the Hollywood music scene, Rust was also a talented painter.

In a statement, V2 President Andy Gershon said, "This is a sad day for all of us at V2. Rust will be sorely missed. Not only was he an incredibly talented musician but a friend. We are saddened by this loss and our hearts go out to his friends and family."

Epique is survived by his wife and family.

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