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Eric Clapton's Crossroads Guitar Festival Hits Theaters Tonight

April event will screen in nearly 500 locations for one-night-only showing

August 13, 2013 12:49 PM ET
Eric Clapton performs during the 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival in New York City.
Eric Clapton performs during the 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival in New York City.
Larry Busacca/Getty Images

Fans who missed out on the Crossroads Guitar Festival this past April at New York's Madison Square Garden can head to select movie theaters tonight for a special one-night-only showing of Eric Clapton's massive event. Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013 will hit nearly 500 locations this evening at 7:30 p.m. local time. The film features highlighted performances from the festival and peeks of backstage access.

Photos: Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013

This year's Crossroads Guitar Festival lineup featured the Allman Brothers Band, Buddy Guy, Booker T., Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, John Mayer, Gary Clark Jr., and Keith Urban, among others, who all appear in the film.

More information, including a full list of participating theaters, is available here.

For a taste of the fest, watch this clip of Clapton and the Allmans blazing through "Why Has Love Got to Be So Sad":

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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