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Eric Clapton Reissuing 'Unplugged' This October

Set will include new songs and rare rehearsal footage

Eric Clapton performs in Munich, Germany.
Stefan M. Prager/Redferns via Getty Images
September 5, 2013 12:25 PM ET

Eric Clapton is reissuing an expanded and remastered version of his smash acoustic album Unplugged this fall. The set includes two discs and a DVD of his entire MTV Unplugged set, as well as never-before-seen rehearsal footage. 

100 Greatest Artists: Eric Clapton

Unplugged has sold over 19 million copies worldwide and won Clapton six Grammy Awards, including "Record of the Year" and "Album of the Year." On this expanded version, the second disc will include several songs not featured on the original such as a cover of Big Maceo Merriweather’s “Worried Life Blues,” an alternate take of  "Walkin’ Blues" and early versions of "Circus" and "My Father’s Eyes" that later appeared on Clapton's Pilgrim

Clapton's been on tour most of the 2013, celebrating his "50th year as a professional musician." On November 14, he'll headline the final night of the Baloise Sessions in Switzerland, an indoor music festival in Basel, Switzerland.

Unplugged: Expanded and Remastered is due out on October 15 on Rhino.

 

 

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