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Eminem Sued By His Mom

Eminem Sued By His Mom

September 20, 1999 12:00 AM ET

Eminem's mother, Debbie Mathers-Briggs, filed a lawsuit Friday against her son in a Michigan court. The suit contends that the twenty-six-year-old hip-hop superstar (born Marshall Bruce Mathers III) slandered her in various broadcast and print interviews, by implying she was an unstable drug abuser. She is seeking $10 million in damages.

The rapper's lawyer, Paul Rosenberg, issued the following statement in response: "Eminem's life is reflected in his music. Everything he has said can be verified as true. Truth is an absolute defense to a claim of defamation. This lawsuit does not come as a surprise to Eminem. His mother has been threatening to sue him since the success of his single 'My Name Is...' It is merely the result of a lifelong strained relationship between him and mother. Regardless, it is still painful to be sued by your mother and therefore the lawsuit will only be dealt with through legal channels."

Mathers-Briggs' attorney, Fred Gibson, could not be reached for comment at press time.

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

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