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Emily's Army Carry the Punk Torch on 'Lost at Seventeen' - Album Premiere

Rock youths ready second record

Emily's Army
Courtesy Rise Records
June 6, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Emily's Army's 'Lost at Seventeen'

They're restless, angsty and young – very young, actually – and on June 11th, Emily's Army will release their second album, the aptly titled Lost at 17, on Rise Records. Now you can take an exclusive first listen to the Oakland band's effort.

Emily's Army is comprised of brothers Cole and Max Becker (who split vocal duties and play guitar and bass, respectively), guitarist Travis Neumann and drummer Joey Armstrong (son of Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong, who also produced the LP). They showcase their knack for ragged So Cal pop-punk with a bleeding heart and a healthy sense of humor. Tracks like "Part Time Bum" and "Gubermensch" are rollicking, infectious kiss-offs, while "On the Roof," "If Our Music Plays Again" and the blistering closer "Lost at 17" exude just the right amount of earnest preciousness needed for adolescent anthems.

"These guys have shown so much growth since they started. Real teenage, loud, fast rock & roll," Billie Joe Armstrong tells Rolling Stone. "Bands like these guys make it easy to produce and it's the reason why I love rock & roll – except the drummer gives me a hard time!"

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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