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Elton Organizes AIDS Benefit

Sting, Alicia Keys team up for AIDS Benefit

October 23, 2001 12:00 AM ET

Sting, Bon Jovi and Matchbox Twenty are among the names that will team up with Elton John for his annual benefit concert for the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

This year John's foundation has teamed up with AIDS Project Los Angeles to put together "The Concert: Twenty Years With AIDS" to commemorate the discovery of the AIDS virus. The show, which will benefit both John's foundation as well as AIDS Project Los Angeles, will be held on December 12th at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles.

Other acts performing at the event are Alicia Keys, Rufus Wainwright, Craig David, Pete Yorn and LeAnn Rimes. Tickets range in price from $103.50 to $1003.50 and are available through Ticketmaster.

John established the nonprofit foundation in 1992 with offices in Los Angeles and London to provide funding for educational programs on HIV/AIDS as well as improved care for individuals living with HIV/AIDS. More information on the foundation is available at its Web site, www.ejaf.org.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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